Amendments to California Paid Sick Leave Law Effective Immediately

Significant amendments to California’s Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014, also known as the California Paid Sick Leave Law, went into effect immediately upon Governor Jerry Brown’s signature on Assembly Bill no. 304 on July 13, 2015.

Key provisions of the Amendment affect calculation of the rate of pay, method of accrual of paid leave, and recordkeeping.

Rate of Pay Calculation

Non-exempt employees. Employers now have an option regarding how to pay sick days for non-exempt employees. The Amendment requires an employer to calculate paid sick time for non-exempt employees using one of the following methods: (1) calculate the regular rate of pay for the workweek in which the employee uses paid sick time, whether or not the employee actually works overtime in that workweek; OR (2) divide the employee’s total wages, not including overtime premium pay, by the employee’s total hours worked in the full pay periods of the prior 90 days of employment.

Exempt employees. The Amendment requires that paid sick time for exempt employees be calculated in the same manner as the employer calculates wages for other forms of paid leave time.

Importantly, the Amendment eliminates the prerequisite that an employee earns commissions, piece rate, varying pay rates or be paid as a salaried nonexempt to trigger any special calculation method.

Alternative Accrual Methods

While employees may continue to accrue at the rate of not less than one hour for every 30 hours worked, the Amendment now allows employers to use the following alternative methods of accrual:

  • New Alternative Accrual Option. This is a welcome change for employers with paid time off policies. The Amendment allows an employer to provide for sick leave accrual on a basis other than one hour for every 30 hours worked, provided that the accrual is on a regular basis and the employee will have 24 hours of accrued sick leave or paid time off by the 120th calendar day of employment of each calendar year, or in each 12-month period.
  • Pre-January 1, 2015 Policies. The Amendment permits an employer to use a prior paid sick leave or paid time off policy which applied to employees before January 1, 2015, using an accrual method different than providing one hour for every 30 hours worked, provided that the accrual is on a regular basis so that an employee, including an employee hired into that class after January 1, 2015, has:
    • no less than one day or eight hours of accrued sick leave or paid time off within three months of employment of each calendar year, or each 12-month period; and
    • the employee was eligible to earn at least three days or 24 hours of sick leave or paid time off within nine months of employment.

If an employer modifies the accrual method used in the policy in place prior to January 1, 2015, the employer shall comply with any accrual method set forth in Labor Code section 246(b) or provide the full amount of leave at the beginning of each year of employment, calendar year, or 12-month period. However, this newly added subsection does not prohibit an employer from increasing the accrual amount or rate for a class of employees covered by the subsection.

Front Load Method

An employer may still satisfy the accrual requirements of the law by providing not less than 24 hours or three days of paid sick leave. The Amendment provides that the accrued time must be available to the employee to use by the completion of his or her 120th calendar day of employment.

Reinstatement of Prior Accrued Time

The Amendment clarifies that an employer is not required to reinstate accrued paid time off to an employee who is rehired within one year of separation from employment and whose accrued time was paid out at termination, resignation, or separation.

Recordkeeping

Existing law requires an employer to keep records for three years, documenting the hours worked and paid sick days accrued and used by an employee and to make those records available to the Labor Commissioner upon request.

The Amendment provides that the employer has no obligation to inquire into or record the purposes for which an employee uses sick leave or paid time off.

Notice for Unlimited Sick Leave or Paid Time Off Policies

The Amendment permits an employer who provides unlimited sick leave or unlimited paid time off to its employees to satisfy the law’s notice requirements by indicating “unlimited” on the employee’s itemized wage statement or the separate writing provided on the designated pay date with the payment of wages.

Other Areas of Clarification

Eligibility. The Amendment clarifies that employees must perform 30 days of work within a year from the commencement of employment for the same employer to be eligible for paid sick leave.

Use. The Amendment permits an employer to limit an employee’s use of paid sick days to 24 hours or three days in each year of employment, a calendar year, or a 12-month period.

Construction Industry. The Amendment modifies the definition of “employees in the construction industry” in Section 245.5(a)(2), which previously defined “employees in the construction industry” as employees performing “on-site” work associated with construction. The new law removes “on-site” from the definition in Section 245.5(a)(2). Now, the definition of “employee in the construction industry” means an employee performing work associated with construction, including work involving alteration, demolition, building, excavation, renovation, remodeling, maintenance, improvement, repair work, and any other work as described by Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 7000) of Division 3 of the Business and Professions Code, and other similar or related occupations or trades.

Public-Sector Employees Who are a Recipient of a Retirement Allowance. The Amendment created another class of employees exempt from the California sick leave requirement: public-sector employees who are a recipient of a retirement allowance and employed without reinstatement into his or her respective retirement system pursuant to certain state laws are not covered by the California sick leave law. Those laws are Article 8 (commencing with Section 21220) of Chapter 12 of Part 3 of Division 5 of Title 2 of the Government Code, or Article 8 (commencing with Section 31680) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 4 of Title 3 of the Government Code.

Broadcasting and Motion Picture Industries. Employers in the broadcasting and motion picture industries covered by Wage Order 11 or 12 of the Industrial Welfare Commission may delay until January 21, 2016, compliance with the requirement to provide notice of the amount of paid sick time available each time wages are paid.

Certain Public-Sector Employees. The Amendment also clarifies California law regarding certain California public sector employee sick leave benefits. Sick leave benefit programs which now meet the requirements of California Labor Code Section 246 include sick leave benefits provided pursuant to Government Code Sections 19859 to 19868.3 or annual leave benefits provided pursuant to Government Code Sections 19858.3 to 19858.7 or by provisions of a memorandum of understanding reached pursuant to Government Code Section 3517.5 that incorporate or supersede provisions of Section 19859 to 19868.3, inclusive, or Sections 19858.3 to 19858.7.

Payroll Masters can handle all of your paid sick leave accruals, pay stub compliance and record keeping/tracking required by state and local jurisdictions. Visit our website.

Source: Jackson | Lewis: California Workplace Law Blog

This document has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please contact your employment attorney in connection with any fact-specific situation in which you intend to take significant employment action. Readers agree that they will not hold Payroll Masters in indemnity and Payroll Masters assumes no liability. Payroll Masters is not engaged in rendering legal or accounting services. Therefore, Payroll Masters assumes no responsibility for claims arising from the use or implementation of the above information. 

Posted in Paid Sick Leave | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

San Francisco Formula Retail Worker Bill of Rights Amendments and Posting Updates

The proposed amendments to the San Francisco Formula Retail Worker Bill of Rights, listed below, have passed as of July 9, 2015. In addition, the OLSE has issued FAQs (click here to download) and a template notice of rights (click here to download) which must be posted by covered employers. Per the Office of Labor Standards Enforcement (OLSE), both of these linked documents will be modified to reflect the changes to the law.

Amendments:

  • More Narrow Coverage: threshold number of locations in order to be a covered employer increased from 20 to 40 establishments worldwide;
  • Collective Bargaining Agreements: employees can waive all protections with bona fide, express CBA provision;
  • On-Call Employee Predictability Pay: on-call employees will also receive “predictability pay” if their schedules are changed with less than 7-days’ notice;
  • Delayed Enforcement: the Office of Labor Standards Enforcement will only issue warnings for violations during the first three months following the July 3rd operative date;
  • Clarified Notice Provisions: employers may notify existing part-time employees of additional available hours by posting in a conspicuous workplace location; and
  • Clarified Acceptance of Additional Hours: employees will have three days to accept in writing any offer of additional hours tendered by employer.

Source: Punam Sarad, Shareholder – Jackson Lewis P.C., San Francisco Office

2015 © Copyright Payroll Masters

This document has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please contact your employment attorney in connection with any fact-specific situation in which you intend to take significant employment action. Readers agree that they will not hold Payroll Masters in indemnity and Payroll Masters assumes no liability. Payroll Masters is not engaged in rendering legal or accounting services. Therefore, Payroll Masters assumes no responsibility for claims arising from the use or implementation of the above information. 

Posted in Employment Law Updates | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

CA Attorney General Partners with U.S. Department of Labor To Combat Wage Theft

LOS ANGELES — On July 28, 2015 Attorney General Kamala D. Harris and the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) signed a cooperative agreement to crack down on employer wage theft and other illegal labor practices. The Memorandum of Understanding signed by both agencies will facilitate the sharing of information and enhance enforcement of labor violations.

“Wage theft is a crime that hurts our economy and robs hard working Californians of their livelihoods,” said Attorney General Harris. “This agreement allows our agencies to better investigate and prosecute those who exploit workers and deny them the pay and benefits they deserve. I thank the Department of Labor for their partnership and commitment to protecting the rights of workers.”

“As host to one of the largest underground economies and immigrant populations in the United States, it makes sense that we begin our quest to combat wage theft. This partnership with the State AG’s office is long over due,” said Ruben Rosalez, regional administrator for the western region for the U.S. Department of Labor.

The agreement establishes a collaborative partnership between the Attorney General’s Office and the U.S. Department of Labor to coordinate enforcement efforts. Specifically, the agreement will enhance both agencies’ ability to investigate and prosecute cases of wage theft and other labor violations through the exchange of investigative information and resources.

The collaborative agreement will work to combat illegal labor practices such as wage theft, which includes violations of minimum wage and overtime laws. In addition, the agreement will help both agencies combat employee misclassification, which denies workers important protections such as overtime pay and unemployment insurance.

Industries most impacted by wage theft include restaurants, janitorial work, the garment industry, retail, construction and car washes.

The Attorney General’s Underground Economy Unit is dedicated to protecting workers’ rights, bringing civil and criminal actions against persons engaged in the underground economy. The Unit’s enforcement efforts are directed at deterring underground economy violations, recapturing lost revenues, and protecting workers and legitimate businesses from illegal and predatory enterprises.

DOJ_DOL

Image: U.S. Department of Labor Regional Administrator for the Western Region Ruben Rosalez and California Department of Justice General Counsel Brian Nelson sign the memorandum of understanding. Photo Credit: Office of the Attorney General.

Source: State of California Department of Justice and Office of Attorney General Kamala D. Harris

2015 © Copyright Payroll Masters

This document has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please contact your employment attorney in connection with any fact-specific situation in which you intend to take significant employment action. Readers agree that they will not hold Payroll Masters in indemnity and Payroll Masters assumes no liability. Payroll Masters is not engaged in rendering legal or accounting services. Therefore, Payroll Masters assumes no responsibility for claims arising from the use or implementation of the above information. 

Posted in DOL, Law Enforcement, Wage Theft | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Workers Affected by California Drought to Receive Temporary Employment

Labor Department announces $18M in National Dislocated Worker Grant funding, July 20, 2015

Now well into its fourth year, one of the worst droughts in California in more than a century continues to cause economic insecurity for many families in the region, particularly in the agriculture sector. A recent University of California Davis study estimates 18,000 people lost jobs because of drought. These losses leave working families struggling to make ends meet, and on July 20th the Department of Labor announced up to $18 million in National Dislocated Worker Grant (formerly referred to as National Emergency Grants) funding to the state of California to provide jobs for workers dislocated by the drought, with $3 million released initially.

“For so many in California’s growing regions, water has been their livelihood for generations,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. “Without it, growth — both the natural growth of living things and of the local economy — slows to a standstill. For those whose ability to provide for their families is most immediately affected by the drought, this funding will provide much needed temporary employment. I am particularly grateful to Congressman Jim Costa — who is announcing the grant in Fresno — for bringing the suffering of these families to my attention and setting in motion this much-needed federal assistance.”

This NDWG will employ up to 1,000 workers for up to six months with public and nonprofit agencies working to remove dead foliage to prevent potential fires and mudslides, and renovating and repairing public facilities damaged by the sustained drought. Made possible by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the grant will focus on the areas facing the most severe impacts in California. Other states that have received a drought emergency declaration and can document drought-impacted job losses will have the option to apply for similar dislocated worker grants. The program will also support youth in drought-impacted households as well as the long-term unemployed.

California’s Employment Development Department will deploy the project funds through the Northern Rural Training and Employment Consortium and through La Cooperativa Campesina de California. NoRTEC — a local Workforce Development Board in the far northern part of the State — and La Cooperativa — a statewide convener of farm worker programs throughout California — will work directly with regional partners and project work sites to assist impacted workers.

As President Obama said on a visit to Fresno, Calif., last year, “California is our biggest economy, California is our biggest agricultural producer, so what happens here matters to every working American, right down to the cost of food that you put on your table.” That’s why the administration has announced new actions and investments of more than $110 million — of which this NDWG is part — to support workers, farmers and rural communities suffering from drought and to combat wildfires. This builds on the more than $190 million that agencies across the federal government have invested to support drought-stricken communities so far this year.

National Dislocated Worker Grants are part of the secretary of labor’s discretionary fund. The department awards the grant based on a state’s ability to meet specific guidelines.

Source: US Department of Labor

2015 © Copyright Payroll Masters

This document has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please contact your employment attorney in connection with any fact-specific situation in which you intend to take significant employment action. Readers agree that they will not hold Payroll Masters in indemnity and Payroll Masters assumes no liability. Payroll Masters is not engaged in rendering legal or accounting services. Therefore, Payroll Masters assumes no responsibility for claims arising from the use or implementation of the above information. 

Posted in DOL | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Cal/OSHA Cites Construction Company in Fatal Steel Pipe Accident

American Canyon—Cal/OSHA cited a Bay Area company following an investigation into a fatal accident at a Petaluma construction site in April. A 28-year-old worker from Novato was killed when a 40-foot concrete-coated steel pipe being unloaded from a forklift rolled down a slope and crushed him.

“This fatality could have been avoided had the required safety measures been in place for working at a hazardous location,” said Christine Baker, Director of the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR). Cal/OSHA is a division of DIR.

The accident occurred around 7 a.m. on April 15 near Highway 101, where Maggiora & Ghilotti, Inc. of San Rafael was replacing an old water pipe. The employee was working with a forklift operator to unload and transport the new pipe down a sloping dirt road. The pipe weighed approximately 8,000 pounds and was not secured to the forklift; it was unloaded directly to the ground without any chocks or barrier to prevent it from moving. The worker was facing the pipe when it slid off the forks, rolled over him and was finally stopped by a chain link fence.

“Employers must be vigilant in recognizing job hazards and keeping their employees safe by taking the necessary precautions in all aspects of an operation,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum.

Cal/OSHA’s American Canyon office issued three citations to Maggiora & Ghilotti for failing to recognize and plan for the hazard of transporting the steel pipe, for failing to survey and plan for the hazards of uneven ground, and for not securing the pipe during transport. The three citations total $38,250.

Cal/OSHA helps protect workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace in California. Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch provides free and voluntary assistance to employers and employee organizations to improve their health and safety programs. Employers should call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation Services.

Source: Cal/OSHA

2015 © Copyright Payroll Masters

This document has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please contact your employment attorney in connection with any fact-specific situation in which you intend to take significant employment action. Readers agree that they will not hold Payroll Masters in indemnity and Payroll Masters assumes no liability. Payroll Masters is not engaged in rendering legal or accounting services. Therefore, Payroll Masters assumes no responsibility for claims arising from the use or implementation of the above information. 

Posted in Cal/OSHA | Leave a comment

IRS is Offering Employers and Coverage Providers Three Affordable Care Act Webinars

This series of educational webinars is designed to help you understand the Affordable Care Act’s employer provisions and related requirements. The IRS is presenting three different webinars later this month that will be repeated in August and September.

The webinars are designed for business owners, tax managers, employee benefits managers and health coverage providers. All times are Eastern.

Employer Shared Responsibility and Information Reporting

Employer-Sponsored Health Coverage Information Reporting Requirements for Applicable Large Employers

Information Reporting Requirements for Providers of Minimal Essential Coverage

For more information about the Affordable Care Act and tax provisions for employers and health coverage providers, visit http://www.irs.gov/Tax-Professionals/ACA-Information-Center-for-Tax-Professionals.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

DIR Releases a Reminder for Employers: California Paid Sick Leave Law Goes into Effect Today

The Labor Commissioner and the Department of Industrial relations have issued a news release reminding employers that today California’s paid sick leave law goes into effect.

“With California’s new paid sick leave law in effect, most workers now won’t have to choose between their family’s health and their job,” said Christine Baker, Director of the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR).

The Healthy Workplace Healthy Family Act of 2014 (Assembly bill 1522) generally provides most employees the ability to accrue at least one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked, paid at the regular rate of the worker’s wages. The employer can also provide employees at least 24 hours of sick leave up front for use during the year. Workers may begin using their accrued hours beginning on the 90th day of employment.

“In order to help achieve healthier workplaces, my office is committed to providing essential education to workers and employers on their rights and responsibilities under the new paid sick leave law,” said Labor Commissioner Julie A. Su.

Retaliation or discrimination against an employee who requests paid sick days or uses paid sick days or both are prohibited. An employee can file a complaint with the Labor Commissioner against an employer who retaliates or discriminates against an employee.

Employers and workers can refer to Payroll Masters webpage or the DIR’s webpage for more information on the new law, including a recorded training webinar and presentation slides, as well as FAQ’s. DIR has also produced a short video on the new law.

The Labor Commissioner’s Office, formally known as the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement, inspects workplaces for wage and hour violations, adjudicates wage claims, enforces prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship standards in public works projects, investigates retaliation and whistleblower complaints, issues licenses and registrations for businesses, and educates the public on labor laws. Updated information on California labor laws is available online.

The Labor Commissioner’s Office is a division within DIR.

Source: DIR

2015 © Copyright Payroll Masters

This document has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please contact your employment attorney in connection with any fact-specific situation in which you intend to take significant employment action. Readers agree that they will not hold Payroll Masters in indemnity and Payroll Masters assumes no liability. Payroll Masters is not engaged in rendering legal or accounting services. Therefore, Payroll Masters assumes no responsibility for claims arising from the use or implementation of the above information. 

Posted in Paid Sick Leave | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Cal/OSHA Issues High Heat Advisory for Northern California

July 1, 2015 – Cal/OSHA is urging all employers, particularly those in the Sacramento Valley and adjacent foothills, to protect their outdoor workers from heat illness. The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning for these areas, where temperatures are expected to rise to highs of 115 degrees through Friday morning. Heat warnings are issued when weather conditions pose a threat to life.

“We want to ensure that the rules in place are followed to protect outdoor workers during soaring temperatures,” said Christine Baker, Director of the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR).

California’s heat regulation requires all employers with outdoor workers to protect outdoor workers by taking these basic steps:

  • Train all employees and supervisors about heat illness prevention.
  • Provide enough fresh water so that each employee can drink at least 1 quart, or four 8-ounce glasses, of water per hour, and encourage them to do so.
  • Provide access to shade and encourage employees to take a cool-down rest in the shade for at least 5 minutes. They should not wait until they feel sick to cool down.
  • Develop and implement written procedures for complying with the Cal/OSHA Heat Illness Prevention Standard.

“Heat illness can be life threatening,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum. “That’s why employers are required to make sure outdoor workers have enough shade, water and rest, even if they don’t see visible symptoms of sickness.”

When temperatures reach 95 degrees, as predicted in Northern California, special “high heat” procedures are also required. These procedures include:

  • Observing workers for signs and symptoms of heat illness.
  • Providing close supervision of workers in their first 14 days of employment to ensure acclimatization.
  • Having effective communication systems in place to be able to call for emergency assistance if necessary.

Cal/OSHA will inspect outdoor worksites in industries such as agriculture, construction, landscaping, and others throughout the heat season. Through partnerships with various employer and worker organizations in different industries, Cal/OSHA will also provide consultation, outreach and training on heat illness prevention.

Online information on the heat illness prevention requirements and training materials can be obtained at Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness web page or the Water. Rest. Shade. campaign site. A Heat Illness Prevention e-tool is also available on Cal/OSHA’s website.

The Division of Occupational Safety and Health, known as Cal/OSHA, is a division of DIR.

Source: DIR

2015 © Copyright Payroll Masters

This document has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please contact your employment attorney in connection with any fact-specific situation in which you intend to take significant employment action. Readers agree that they will not hold Payroll Masters in indemnity and Payroll Masters assumes no liability. Payroll Masters is not engaged in rendering legal or accounting services. Therefore, Payroll Masters assumes no responsibility for claims arising from the use or implementation of the above information. 

Posted in Heat Advisory | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

HR Expert Q & A – Paid Sick Leave

When choosing between Paid Sick Leave’s (PSL’s) accrual method or the up-front (lump sum) method of distributing PSL, there are advantages and disadvantages to both. Additionally, the work schedules, OT requirements, wage orders, and number of full-time, part-time, seasonal/temporary employees are unique to each employer. So much to consider! Here are a few simple considerations you might like to review. Remember, you CAN change your distribution method – preferably with strategic planning, cost analysis, and advance notice.

Up-Front (Lump Sum) Method:

  • Easy to administer:  one lump sum distribution and no carry over. If administration and tracking is easy, then it’s cost effective.
  • May not be fair to all employees:  employees who work only a very few hours per week, or who don’t work a full year, will get an equal amount of PSL as those employees who work full-time (and OT).
  • Note:  You could give regular, full-time employees more than 3 days of PSL, and give part-time and seasonal/temporary employees the legal minimum of 3 days. This is allowed because you would give different benefits to different employee classifications.

Accrual Method:

  • This may be easier to administer if all of your other benefits are based on an accrual method.  The set-up is already established and there cost effective.
  • If you don’t have the accrual method already set-up in your system, it may be burdensome and time consuming to set-up.  That’s expensive.
  • This method is fair to all employees because the amount of PSL they earn is directly correlated to how much time they work.
  • With no accrual cap, full-time employees can accrue almost 9 days of PSL – more when you count OT.  If you have lots of full-time employees and lots of OT, this could be expensive.
  • Note:  You can cap accruals and carry-over at 6 days.

Source: Article by Kathrine Parsons, SPHR-CA, TPO

Copyright 2015 TPO The HR Experts 2015 – all rights reserved.  www.tpohr.com

This document has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please contact your employment attorney in connection with any fact-specific situation in which you intend to take significant employment action. Readers agree that they will not hold Payroll Masters in indemnity and Payroll Masters assumes no liability. Payroll Masters is not engaged in rendering legal or accounting services. Therefore, Payroll Masters assumes no responsibility for claims arising from the use or implementation of the above information. 

Posted in Paid Sick Leave | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

New Cal/OSHA Educational Materials for Workers and Employers Now Available Online

Oakland — Cal/OSHA released two new fact sheets this month that expand upon resources available to the public. Health & Safety Rights: Facts for California Workers details ways for employees to work with employers and Cal/OSHA to keep their jobs safe. Protecting Temporary Agency Employees provides information on the requirements in California for temp agencies, professional employer organizations (PEOs), and host employers to protect workers from safety and health hazards in the host employer’s workplace.

“These new online educational tools are part of Cal/OSHA’s ongoing efforts to help employers and employees access critical information on workplace safety,” said Christine Baker, Director of the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR). Cal/OSHA is a division within DIR.

The workers’ rights fact sheet is the first Cal/OSHA publication to focus primarily on workers’ basic rights to a safe and healthful workplace and how to work with Cal/OSHA before, during, and after an inspection. Cal/OSHA will distribute printed versions at community events, training sessions and during onsite visits. The temp agency worker factsheet is the first to explain California-specific legal obligations of multiple employers that employ the same workers and is based on recent case law and Cal/OSHA’s Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) requirements. It is timely given the rise in temporary workers, who are particularly vulnerable to hazards on the job.

“Cal/OSHA developed this workers’ rights fact sheet with input from a broad range of employers, employees and interested parties to help ensure safe and healthful workplaces,” said Juliann Sum, Chief of Cal/OSHA.

Cal/OSHA helps protect workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace in California. Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch provides free and voluntary assistance to employers and employee organizations to improve their health and safety programs. Employers should call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation Services.

Source: Department of Industrial Relations

Posted in Cal/OSHA | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment